How to Make an Eco-friendly Rakhi With Items Already In Your Home

Raksha Bandhan is one of the first major festivals that will bear the brunt of the pandemic. Restriction of movement across India and lockdown in some parts has limited shopping activity. Courier services are also disrupted, making it further challenging to send gifts and parcels.

In this scenario, we must do our best with what we can. For instance, my aunt asked me to tie a thread around my father’s wrist on her behalf. Meanwhile, I asked my cousin to reuse last year’s rakhi that he thoughtfully preserved. 

However, you can still show your love to your brother by making a rakhi at home. The Better India spoke to Vachana Waghle, an eco-conscious artist in Pune. Her Facebook page, ‘Hobby Quills’ is a testimony to her love for the environment, where she shows how to make useful items by upcycling old or waste ones.

“I have always been inclined towards upcycling things. On my friend’s encouragement in 2015, I came on Facebook to showcase my products like quills, earrings, home decor items and so on. A lot of appreciation poured in, and I gradually started selling them,” Vachana tells The Better India

She also started making rakhis from discarded items but soon realised that courier services in her area had been discontinued. 

Not one to be dejected, this eco-warrior has already started sharing videos on making rakhis. “Rakhi is just not a piece of thread; it celebrates the beautiful bond between brothers and sisters. My steps are very simple, and you can follow them at home easily.” 

Materials Required

  • Scissors
  • Fabric glue/needle
  • An old piece of cloth
  • Cardboard/cereal box/patchwork/grains
  • Marker/acrylic paints/

Approximate time needed: 20-30 minutes

Steps

For Patchwork

  • Cut a piece of cloth in the shape of your choice (Vachana recommends a rectangle). The size should be around 4×4 inch. 
  • Secure the edges with a simple stitch or make a small fold and glue it.
  • Use acrylic paints or markers to draw or write. Sketch pens or usual watercolours can wear off easily. 
  • Alternatively, you can also reuse embellishments like a broach. 
  • For a child’s rakhi, use cardboard or cereal box and cut them round. Cover them with a cloth so that they don’t tear. 
  • You can also stick grains like lentils or rice on the piece of cloth as decoration.

For the Thread 

  • Cut a piece of cloth in straight lines or opt for wool or a religious thread.
  • There are different looks you can give to the thread. This includes braiding, knotting or simply leaving them open.
  • Vachana suggests using 3-4 strands to make the rakhi sturdy.
  • Close the end of the threads by glue or a simple stitch.

Pro-tip: Twist thread or wool around the fingers for about 10-15 rounds.

Final Touches 

  • If you have used fabric glue, then allow everything to dry.
  • In the final step, attach the patch with the thread with glue or stitch. Voila, your rakhi is ready!

Now that you see how simple it is to make a rakhi, start by making one with the items at your home and make your sibling smile with this hand-made and heartfelt gift, which also came at zero cost.

(Edited by Shruti Singhal)

Featured Image Source: HobbyQuills

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *